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To Beijing

I took a trip out to Shanghai on Wednesday to interview with Pacific Epoch. They do technology and media research, and needed an editor. It sounded like it might be an interesting job, and a good way to learn about an industry while getting some experience under my belt, but it looks like it's just going to be mostly tedious proofreading. They had me edit some sample articles, and the way it worked was, they had their Chinese staff pick out some news items from Chinese sites, and write brief English summaries. I was to fix the English, and make sure that the summary contained all the important information and no irrelevant information. The problem was, their English was so atrocious that in some cases they actually conveyed the exact opposite meaning of that intended, so for every article I had to go back and read the original Chinese in its entirety and write my own summary. That in itself is fine, and I'm glad for the opportunity to use my language ability, but for them to give me this broken English is just a waste of my and the Chinese staff's time.

Anyway, when I came back to Nanjing, I just booked myself a ticket up to Beijing. I'll see if this place makes me an offer, but if they don't, I don't think I will be too sad.

I bought a big peasant suitcase with the red white and blue to dump all of my bulky clothes in. I always like to travel in style.

Graduation now, more later.

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I have but few words tonight. I will first share with you a cartoon I drew several years back when I was a fiery little upstart, before I had truly learned to appreciate the glory of the Communist Party: