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Thugs and Goons, Resilient in Face of Change

As I began work this morning, and dove into my daily task of figuring out how to procrastinate for eight and a half hours, I started, as usual, by reading through the China articles on the New York Times website.  The first article to fall across my screen was yet another monthly reminder by Jim Yardley of why, exactly, the Chinese Communist Party is still in power, because apparently we keep forgetting.  Either that, or we're just downright impatient.  The headline was:
China's Communists, Resilient in Face of Change


A few hours later I found that the page had refreshed itself, inexplicably bearing a new title:
China's Leaders Are Resilient in Face of Change


The second title is actually more fitting for the article itself, which is more informative and less colored than the first title would lead you to believe.  But I wonder what the explanation is for the title change.  Did it all of a sudden occur to some editor that "Oh yes, those pesky Communists are leading the country, aren't they?  How inconvenient."

On a related note, tomorrow is the opening ceremony of the Olympics, and in an unoriginal show of confused irony and ambivalence, I plan on wearing my I Heart China shirt.  Either that or an American flag;  I still haven't decided.

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I spent two nights in Lombok and a day hanging ar…